5 tips for putting equipment into your grant.

I previously wrote about how to assess needs for large equipment purchases for a group. Today I wanted to touch on another issue I run into while working with PIs. Specifically,  the PI who has received funding from an internal or external source to purchase a microscope for their own lab, then finds themselves without enough money to purchase the scope they need.

microscopeIn this case, I am talking about anything from a $5K tissue culture scope to a $60K fluorescent scope.

I have worked with a number of PIs who need a microscope, but who are not microscopiest. They came up with a funding line based on discussions with friends and colleagues or single quotes from a familiar source. However, when the funds come and they start looking around to make a purchase, they find that the system they need is too expensive.

Why?

In my experience, the people who find themselves in this situation were often faced with last minute budgeting and raced to find a number, any number, to put into their submission. I recall when I was submitting grants massive amount of supporting materials that are required. If you aren’t prepared for this, then you might find yourself struggling with Biosketch formatting at the same time you are looking for last minute quotes. Hey, Joe down the hall uses microscopes, he could help me out with a budget for a cell culture scope. Next thing you know, your budget of $3000 is trying to buy a $6000 microscope.

So, here are my two tips for putting equipment in a personal grant or for internal submission.

  1. Start early. Just as you will be thinking about your Specific Aims from the start, spend some time over your morning coffee thinking about what equipment you will need to achieve each Aim.
  2. Put the burden on the vendors to educate you. Google the type of equipment you are looking for and then Cut and Paste your needs for that equipment into the quote request form for each and every supplier. When you are inevitably contacted by the vendor, send them a canned response that you would like a quote for a grant submission and Paste the needs into the email.
  3. If you aren’t familiar with the equipment, do a series of short demonstrations. Two subpoints: 1) just because you do super-resolution doesn’t mean you know what you need in a tissue culture scope 2) the demonstrations can be short and sweet, but make sure the vendors proves they can meet your needs. For instance, tissue culture scope demonstrations can last 15-30 minutes. Here is our scope, here is how you work it, here is what your cells looks like, here is how you capture an image if you want, here are some cool features you might like – you try it.
  4. You need to make the decision, not your graduate students or postdocs. I often hear how “the lab” will be making the decision because they are the ones who will be using it. However, “the lab” is not the one who is applying for funds that will determine whether or not they have jobs next year. Also, “the lab” might not know the nuances or future directions you are considering. Their input is essential, but your name is on the door for a reason.
  5. Budget twice, cut once. Ask for everything you might need and get a list price quote for the equipment that best meets your needs. You won’t get all the money. Don’t ask for steep discounts when submitting the grant. Wait until you receive 75% of what you asked for, then figure out what kind of system you can buy for that price.

 

Okay, those are my thoughts. What did I miss? Where am I wrong? I welcome your input.

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